Indonesia showcases cultural diversity to attract tourism

2019/11/08 20:58:46 fontsize-small fontsize-default fontsize-big
Adila (second left), director of Tourism and Transportation Dept. at Indonesian Economic and Trade Office to Taipei

Adila (second left), director of Tourism and Transportation Dept. at Indonesian Economic and Trade Office to Taipei

Taipei, Nov. 8 (CNA) The Indonesian representative office in Taipei is showcasing the country's cultural diversity at the four-day Taipei International Travel Fair that kicked off Friday, in an effort to attract Taiwanese tourists.

Traditional Balinese dances and music played on the sasando, a folk instrument native to Indonesia's Rote Island, are being showcased at the Indonesian pavilion that is part of the fair, taking place Nov. 8-11 at the Taiwan World Trade Center Nangang Exhibition Hall.



The traditional technique of wax-resist dyeing, batik, is also being demonstrated at the pavilion, with visitors invited to paint dots and lines onto fabric with a special tool called a tjanting.

The pavilion also gives visitors the opportunity to sample hand drip coffee made from Indonesian coffee beans, as well as to enjoy a free traditional massage with candle-heated oil.

Dadang, division head of Taiwan market promotion under Indonesia's tourism ministry, told CNA that his department is targeting Taiwanese visitors.

"This time, we are trying to make the pavilion as interesting as possible," he said, adding that his ministry is trying to attract more Taiwanese visitors by sharing with them aspects of Indonesia's cultural diversity that perhaps have not been well-known.

One of the highlights, which will be popular with Taiwanese tourists, is the Borobudur temple, located in Magelang, Central Java, Dadang said.

"The Borobudur temple is a Buddhist temple and a lot of Taiwanese are Buddhists, so I believe they will be keen to visit," he said.

With over 230,000 trips made by Taiwanese visitors to Indonesia in 2018, he expressed hope that the number can be increased to 300,000 by the end of 2020.







(By William Yen)
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